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Insightful article re: nourishment challenges NC

Insightful article re: nourishment challenges NC




Found the linked article very interesting regarding beach erosion and nourishment. Just wanted to share.

indyweek.com/news/killing...


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RE: Insightful article re: nourishment challenges NC




I have been a "supporter" of Orrin Pilkey since reading a book he co-authored back in the 70s entitled "The Beaches are Moving". The article linked by Marylander is from 2005. The first part of the article is right on the money. The second part which focuses on the nourishment programs in Emerald Isle I can't speak to as I have never been there. Maybe some others can tell us about the beach conditions there.

In any case, let the debate begin.


RE: Insightful article re: nourishment challenges NC




Embarrased to admit I didn't even look at the date. Google news put it in my feed and I read it. I looked the author up and discovered he does have a very current opinion he's promoting. Check out the link if interested.

nicholas.duke.edu/news/fa...


RE: Insightful article re: nourishment challenges NC




Thanks, marylander. Appreciate that more current link especially.


RE: Insightful article re: nourishment challenges NC




I was wondering how the Netherlands has been dealing with erosion and sea level rise given that most of their nation is below sea level. It seems they've created quite a novel approach by inventing a "sand motor"; see the linked article. It appears to constantly pump sand into the waves to bring onshore in a more natural way. It appears to be working, albeit, too early to know if it's a long-term solution and is it scalable for the US. Might be a better option than constant nourishment projects or pack up and move everyone off the coast.

www.businessinsider.com/n...


RE: Insightful article re: nourishment challenges NC




Embarrased to admit I didn't even look at the date. Google news put it in my feed and I read it. I looked the author up and discovered he does have a very current opinion he's promoting. Check out the link if interested.

marylander


No problem as the article is still valid. And thanks for the newer one. Anyway I would be interested with comments by anyone who has been to the beach in Emerald Isle.



RE: Insightful article re: nourishment challenges NC




good reading - both articles


RE: Insightful article re: nourishment challenges NC




Embarrased to admit I didn't even look at the date. Google news put it in my feed and I read it. I looked the author up and discovered he does have a very current opinion he's promoting. Check out the link if interested.

marylander


I would be interested with comments by anyone who has been to the beach in Emerald Isle.

Robert


I was wondering the same thing.

I was even wondering if there are any differences in the beaches at Nags Head or Kitty Hawk. Does it look and feel like the beach did before nourishment? The idea of having killed off all the coquina clams, mole crabs, ghost crabs, etc, is understood. Nourishment isn't good for wild life. But I did see someone post a comment last week that the sand in Nags Head was like mud and wondered if that was true.








RE: Insightful article re: nourishment challenges NC




Friends have owned an ocean front condo in Emerald Ilse for 25 years. They say the beach nourishment is doing fine and holding up well.


RE: Insightful article re: nourishment challenges NC




I was even wondering if there are any differences in the beaches at Nags Head or Kitty Hawk. Does it look and feel like the beach did before nourishment?

marylander


We were in South Nags Head in October and the sand was fine. Similarly after the previous nourishment in 2011 or so the sand was OK. Other than adding what felt like a mile to the walk from access to water I didn't notice much of a difference. I believe the sand for NH was screened and the dredges were located pretty far off shore when we saw them starting the project in the spring. I didn't notice anything obvious as far as additional shell deposits or sharp shells.

The idea of having killed off all the coquina clams, mole crabs, ghost crabs, etc, is understood.

marylander


I also didn't notice any more or less mole crabs although a few months had passed since nourishment completed and we arrived.

I did see someone post a comment last week that the sand in Nags Head was like mud and wondered if that was true.

marylander


That comment might need some explanation. My guess would be the texture of sand was like mud, i.e. perhaps it was really soupy, swallowed the feet when walking, and generally made things difficult for walking and driving. In October the sand felt a lot like my expectations of sand. In October there was definitely no mud or anything that wasn't expected present.


RE: Insightful article re: nourishment challenges NC




I did see someone post a comment last week that the sand in Nags Head was like mud and wondered if that was true.

marylander


That comment might need some explanation. My guess would be the texture of sand was like mud, i.e. perhaps it was really soupy, swallowed the feet when walking, and generally made things difficult for walking and driving. In October the sand felt a lot like my expectations of sand. In October there was definitely no mud or anything that wasn't expected present.

Mstaszew


Your interpretation was the same as mine. Though the article also mentioned mud involved in at least one of the studied nourishment programs, so I thought maybe it was about that . . . which is why I asked. Thanks.


RE: Insightful article re: nourishment challenges NC




I did see someone post a comment last week that the sand in Nags Head was like mud and wondered if that was true.

marylander


That comment might need some explanation. My guess would be the texture of sand was like mud, i.e. perhaps it was really soupy, swallowed the feet when walking, and generally made things difficult for walking and driving. In October the sand felt a lot like my expectations of sand. In October there was definitely no mud or anything that wasn't expected present.

Mstaszew


Your interpretation was the same as mine. Though the article also mentioned mud involved in at least one of the studied nourishment programs, so I thought maybe it was about that . . . which is why I asked. Thanks.

marylander



Immediately after the NH nourishment was complete, the sand may have been a little coarser at first, but it was never muddy or soupy.


RE: Insightful article re: nourishment challenges NC




The idea of having killed off all the coquina clams, mole crabs, ghost crabs, etc, is understood. Nourishment isn't good for wild life.

marylander

This is an interesting comment, but I don't think it is true. Yeah, there is probably a temporary disruption to wild life, but having stayed on a beach shortly after beach nourishment, the ghost crab hunting at night was as good as any beach in NC. What is that Jurassic park quote? "Nature finds a way".

I'm neither for or against beach nourishment. One thing that seems to be true though, is that NC beach communities don't seem to bring in enough money to afford beach nourishment at the rate that will be needed. I think it works in places like New Jersey because of the income generated. The other factor is location. I have no ideal why, but southerly facing beaches seem to do better.

John


RE: Insightful article re: nourishment challenges NC




I’d be interested to know more about the funding for beach nourishment. The article said it is paid for by both tax dollars and private companies paid by property owners.

I would assume the Outer Banks takes in billions of dollars in rental income for any given year. There’s sales tax on that money, then there’s property taxes on businesses and homes. How much state tax do property management companies pay?

Are there organizations of wealthy owners that could get together and come up with a few million to do some of the beaches in front of their homes? Or would that just be throwing good money after bad?

Say you owned like 5 million dollars worth of OF real estate, could you get together with some others who also have similar means to hire a private company to do some beach nourishment around you? Or would it make more financial sense to just sell the property or let the ocean reclaim it and try to collect insurance money?


RE: Insightful article re: nourishment challenges NC




CAMA rules are pretty clear about all projects dealing with preserving the beachfront.
Click to follow link...
I am surprised about the reports of cobbles and mud especially. Engineering companies are required to find sand that is sorted nearly identically to the local sand it is replacing. This is to keep the habitat as similar as possible to what wildlife is accustomed to there. As much respect as I am sure Dr. Pilkey is due, I haven't seen any other articles connected to the conditions in Emerald Isle other than articles that come from his program. Maybe others have seen different sources/reports?

Here is a good article about where funding for nourishment comes from in Dare County: Click to follow link...



RE: Insightful article re: nourishment challenges NC




I'm not touching this one.... smiley with shades


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