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Sunday Storm - Mirlo

By: Tim-OBX
11/17/2019 2:28 PM

I saw this on FB



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By: kernersvilleobx
11/19/2019 6:37 PM

Where is that?

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By: SkipsterPA
11/19/2019 8:53 PM

I wonder how much money has been spent over the years rebuilding that stretch of dunes. Probably would pay for a lot of the new bridge. So what is the plan to keep the water off of the Rt 12 cul de sac once the new bridge is open?

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By: judyk
11/19/2019 9:19 PM

Where is that?

kernersvilleobx


That’s route 12 heading into Rodanthe.
There’s much more info on the northeaster in several other threads

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By: Alexy
11/20/2019 1:11 AM

I wonder how much money has been spent over the years rebuilding that stretch of dunes. Probably would pay for a lot of the new bridge. So what is the plan to keep the water off of the Rt 12 cul de sac once the new bridge is open?

SkipsterPA

There is none. Above the houses pictured there the right of way for the road will revert back to the US Fish and Wildlife service and they have no plans to maintain it.

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By: NCSU Dad
11/20/2019 6:53 AM

I wonder how much money has been spent over the years rebuilding that stretch of dunes. Probably would pay for a lot of the new bridge. So what is the plan to keep the water off of the Rt 12 cul de sac once the new bridge is open?

SkipsterPA

There is none. Above the houses pictured there the right of way for the road will revert back to the US Fish and Wildlife service and they have no plans to maintain it.

Alexy

It'll be interesting to watch how that stretch of the island north of Mirlo changes over time once no one is rebuilding the dunes.

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By: hoi toide
11/20/2019 7:32 AM

IG photography by Daniel Pullen



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By: Squid Pro Quo
11/20/2019 7:49 AM

IG photography by Daniel Pullen

hoi toide


Although I won’t disagree with climate change, that’s not what’s causing the over wash at Mirlo. The island has been moving for eons, but then people built houses. You might have noticed that the houses don’t move, but the island does. You can’t build a dune that will stop it, nor can you re-nourish a beach to stop it. Fact: Barrier islands move, and big surf takes down man made structures.

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By: hoi toide
11/20/2019 8:08 AM

IG photography by Daniel Pullen

hoi toide


Although I won’t disagree with climate change, that’s not what’s causing the over wash at Mirlo. The island has been moving for eons, but then people built houses. You might have noticed that the houses don’t move, but the island does. You can’t build a dune that will stop it, nor can you re-nourish a beach to stop it. Fact: Barrier islands move, and big surf takes down man made structures.

Squid Pro Quo


Absolutely...I was merely interested in the pics.



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By: Robert
11/20/2019 8:48 AM

IG photography by Daniel Pullen

hoi toide


Although I won’t disagree with climate change, that’s not what’s causing the over wash at Mirlo. The island has been moving for eons, but then people built houses. You might have noticed that the houses don’t move, but the island does. You can’t build a dune that will stop it, nor can you re-nourish a beach to stop it. Fact: Barrier islands move, and big surf takes down man made structures.

Squid Pro Quo


Amen SPQ....maybe finally folks are waking up to that fact as was written about 35 years ago in "The Beaches Are Moving -
The Drowning of America's Shoreline" by Orrin Pilkey.

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By: Squid Pro Quo
11/20/2019 9:24 AM

IG photography by Daniel Pullen

hoi toide


Although I won’t disagree with climate change, that’s not what’s causing the over wash at Mirlo. The island has been moving for eons, but then people built houses. You might have noticed that the houses don’t move, but the island does. You can’t build a dune that will stop it, nor can you re-nourish a beach to stop it. Fact: Barrier islands move, and big surf takes down man made structures.

Squid Pro Quo


Absolutely...I was merely interested in the pics.

hoi toide


I was reacting to all of the hashtag comments Daniel has under his post. #Climatechange, #Sealevelrise...…..I might need to school him on the history of the "Ribbon of Sand".

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By: nicki
11/20/2019 9:54 AM

Indeed. And before "Ribbon of Sand" was David Stick's book "History of the Outer Banks" which was written in the 1950's. It is full of examples...I was amazed at the drastic changes. Entire areas that once held houses, lighthouses or even forts..either submerged by water or covered in sand. Inlets opening and closing from one end of the banks to the other, homes being disassembled and moved to avoid water or sand. I found it fascinating.

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By: Squid Pro Quo
11/20/2019 10:52 AM

Indeed. And before "Ribbon of Sand" was David Stick's book "History of the Outer Banks" which was written in the 1950's. It is full of examples...I was amazed at the drastic changes. Entire areas that once held houses, lighthouses or even forts..either submerged by water or covered in sand. Inlets opening and closing from one end of the banks to the other, homes being disassembled and moved to avoid water or sand. I found it fascinating.

nicki


I may have to read that book again! What got me to writing about this was a memory that popped up in my Facebook feed this morning from ten years ago. It was an picture of the house "Serendipity" (Yes, Nights in Rodanthe fame) that was it's own island in a winter Nor' Easter. The house was moved shortly after that, but may again be in peril in the near future. I'm also amazed at the loss of island at Hatteras Inlet. Work is about to begin moving the submarine cable that feeds power to Ocracoke because the cable crossing will soon be awash. The new cable will go under water near the Coast Guard Station near the ferry docks. 25 years ago you could almost throw a rock across the inlet, but now it's 2 miles wide. You can imagine why it shoals so badly. When it was narrow, the depth of the channel was 45' in some spots due to the scouring of the incoming/outgoing tides. With a wider inlet, scour is reduced exponentially because the water is spread out so much further between the islands.

She's a movin'

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By: Crunch
11/20/2019 11:23 AM

"How to Read a North Carolina Beach", also by Pilkey and others, describes the mechanics of the beach moving toward the mainland as sea levels rise, sometimes uncovering ancient forests and peat bogs that used to be on the back side of the island.

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By: judyk
11/20/2019 11:33 AM

I remember a plot of the loss of beachfront over a period of years , perhaps early 1900s to current that was on the dare county site. I haven’t looked for it recently. Not surprisingly, it was very illuminating, with the Rodanthe area showing the biggest difference.

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By: hoi toide
11/20/2019 12:43 PM

Ta Da...



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By: hoi toide
11/20/2019 12:43 PM

Ta Da...



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By: hoi toide
11/20/2019 12:43 PM

Ta Da...



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By: Basskat
11/20/2019 1:45 PM

Altitude 12 on YouTube has some exceptional drone footage of the area along with Avon. Good stuff and subscribe to Kevin’s link.

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