High ground in Avon

By: Juju obx
10/10/2019 2:46 PM

We are fairly new Avon homeowners (purchased in April 2018) Recently we decided to purchase an old 4x4 to leave at the cottage to use on the beach when we are down. Unfortunately we bought it right before Dorian and made the unfortunate decision to leave it here during the storm. With the 3-4’ of water that came under the cottage, needless to say, the vehicle is now toast Sad smiley

We do however feel very lucky, since this was our only real issue after the storm. Our hearts go out to those that suffered such devastating damages on other parts of the island and on Ocracoke.

My question is this...if we decide to buy another vehicle to leave down here, is there a good place on Avon to park it before a storm? Someplace on higher ground and that allows the public to leave a vehicle? Figure it can’t hurt to plan ahead! Thx

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By: Corakers Dad
10/10/2019 4:00 PM

What part of Avon you in? The best place is either the North end , by kitty hawk kites or down by the old movie theater or at ACE. No one will say anything about you leaving a vehicle, just don't leave it to long after the storm.

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By: SteveWolf
10/10/2019 4:49 PM

I sometimes see vehicles lifted quite high sitting on ramps left at houses. Need a tray to pull the car up on that will float the vehicle up with the flood.

The post office seems popular although even there people were leaving their cars up on ramps.

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By: Brad Z
10/10/2019 4:50 PM

We keep a spare car down here since we usually fly in. It's a bit of a trek from Avon, but everyone down our way in Frisco will temporarily park their vehicles along the road to Billy Mitchell Airport/Campground. It's practically the highlands of Hatteras.

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By: Juju obx
10/10/2019 5:47 PM

Corakers Dad...we are on Pheasant Circle which is on the south end about a block from Ace. I thought I had seen video of water over the theater parking lot during Dorian, but I could be wrong. Or maybe it wasn't enough to flood a vehicle.

From what we were told prior to the storm by a neighbor, properties on our road rarely flood (only a few inches usually). But I guess you never know since no two storms are alike.

I have heard the post office as a suggestion before. Anyone know how that lot did during Dorian?

Thanks for the suggestions!

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By: obxmini
10/10/2019 6:41 PM

Is there anyone you might be able to entrust with moving your car, otherwise you'll have to come down in order to move it which might not be so easy. Just a thought.

We have some friends that have a place down on St. Croix and they are only there in the late fall to early spring. They have worked out an arrangement with a neighbor who lives there full-time, which involves payment I believe, to take care of their car as needs arrive.

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By: Corakers Dad
10/10/2019 7:20 PM

Juju, you are right, the lot at the theater did get water, a couple inches deep, ACE's lot stayed dry. I was at ACE Friday afternoon, as the storm subsided, even then all the lots were dry. Of course, if it comes up fast, then goes down fast it can still ruin a vehicle.

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By: Beachmark
10/10/2019 8:20 PM

If you get another 'cane like Irene or Aurthur, it is going to be a lot deeper in Avon. Dorain and Matthew winds dominated from the north after they passed, so pushed more water into Frisco, Hatteras, and Ocracoke. The tracks of Irene and Arthur were such for the winds to dominate out of the west, and Avon, and the Tri-villages got deep water. it was 4' deep on NC12 in Waves in Irene, and 2-3' deep in Avon for either Irene or Arthur on NC 12up by the Outer Beaches office. So OP, your next vehicle may not last very long. I just dunno a high spot in Avon, like at Billy Mitchell airport as mentioned.

If you do.... DON'T park it under your house and DO disconnect the battery before the 'cane. Salt water will short out the car's electrical system and the energy in the battery is enough to set a car on fire if it shorts in the right spot. We had a car in a carport near us in Irene that caught on fire due to the electrical system shorting in the storm surge. The only reason that the house did not burn down was that the Salvo fire chief lives 1 block away and saw the smoke, and they went out in the receding storm water, partly controlled the car fire, threw a chain and hook through the back window of the car, and dragged it out still smoldering. The carport was singed black... it was that close.

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By: TwentyPSI
10/11/2019 9:57 AM

My family has owned a canal front house in north Avon for 40 years. In the early 80s, before we understood the hazards, we kept a '71 Wagoneer under the house. We lost it in Hurricane Gloria in 1985 despite parking it on high ground near route 12 before departing. Sound side flooding in Avon during Gloria was six feet deep, two feet deeper than Dorian.

While it was a flood that killed the Wagoneer, we learned that corrosion was also a serious issue. A car sitting undriven for weeks at a time, exposed to salt air, rusts quickly. Keeping the undercarriage and wiring in good condition was challenging.

After Gloria, we considered an elevated garage, but decided that the most economical solution was to not leave a car on island. The garage would have been one more structure to maintain in a harsh environment. And building one high enough to be guaranteed not to flood would have been expensive.

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By: ultrahog99
10/11/2019 5:09 PM

My family has owned a canal front house in north Avon for 40 years. In the early 80s, before we understood the hazards, we kept a '71 Wagoneer under the house. We lost it in Hurricane Gloria in 1985 despite parking it on high ground near route 12 before departing. Sound side flooding in Avon during Gloria was six feet deep, two feet deeper than Dorian.

While it was a flood that killed the Wagoneer, we learned that corrosion was also a serious issue. A car sitting undriven for weeks at a time, exposed to salt air, rusts quickly. Keeping the undercarriage and wiring in good condition was challenging.

After Gloria, we considered an elevated garage, but decided that the most economical solution was to not leave a car on island. The garage would have been one more structure to maintain in a harsh environment. And building one high enough to be guaranteed not to flood would have been expensive.

TwentyPSI

Expensive...unless you are this guy. Clapping smiley



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By: ultrahog99
10/11/2019 5:13 PM

My family has owned a canal front house in north Avon for 40 years. In the early 80s, before we understood the hazards, we kept a '71 Wagoneer under the house. We lost it in Hurricane Gloria in 1985 despite parking it on high ground near route 12 before departing. Sound side flooding in Avon during Gloria was six feet deep, two feet deeper than Dorian.

While it was a flood that killed the Wagoneer, we learned that corrosion was also a serious issue. A car sitting undriven for weeks at a time, exposed to salt air, rusts quickly. Keeping the undercarriage and wiring in good condition was challenging.

After Gloria, we considered an elevated garage, but decided that the most economical solution was to not leave a car on island. The garage would have been one more structure to maintain in a harsh environment. And building one high enough to be guaranteed not to flood would have been expensive.

TwentyPSI

Expensive...unless you are this guy. Clapping smiley



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