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Local seafood

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Local seafood
Posted By: General Lee - (Send PM)
Member Since: 7/30/2007
Location: Huntingdon,PA
Total Posts: 70

Date Posted: 4/18/2017 8:33 PM




Why is it so difficult to find out which Hatteras Island restaurants serve local freshly caught seafood? I am headed down in 2 weeks and have been scouring every website I can think of with no luck, I thought sure the Outer Banks Catch site would list them but when you click on the restaurants tab it just keeps looping me right back where I started.

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RE: Local seafood
Posted By: Brad Z - (Send PM)
Member Since: 2/13/2016
Location: Alexandria VA/ Frisco NC
Total Posts: 464

Date Posted: 4/18/2017 9:10 PM




Why is it so difficult to find out which Hatteras Island restaurants serve local freshly caught seafood? I am headed down in 2 weeks and have been scouring every website I can think of with no luck, I thought sure the Outer Banks Catch site would list them but when you click on the restaurants tab it just keeps looping me right back where I started.



It's likely quite varied, depending on the season availability, etc. Your best bet is to call ahead, or ask your server. Also re: your Dirty Dicks profile photo, They're probably the last place you'd want to go on Hatteras if you're looking for fresh, local seafood.

RE: Local seafood
Posted By: Tim-OBX - (Send PM)
Member Since: 6/2/2004
Location: Kitty Hawk
Total Posts: 17744

Date Posted: 4/18/2017 9:17 PM




Why is it so difficult to find out which Hatteras Island restaurants serve local freshly caught seafood? I am headed down in 2 weeks and have been scouring every website I can think of with no luck, I thought sure the Outer Banks Catch site would list them but when you click on the restaurants tab it just keeps looping me right back where I started.



Because they really don't want to lie to you. Our seafood goes to the highest bidder= new york, not nags head.

RE: Local seafood
Posted By: judyk - (Send PM)
Member Since: 11/1/2008
Location: eastern PA
Total Posts: 14114

Date Posted: 4/18/2017 9:27 PM




The web site doesn't say much. Basically, right now, one special a week qualifies as fresh catch membership to advertise as part of the program. However, it lists son to come different percentile categories of 50-80% and over 80%. I would think many of the restaurants on Hatteras Island serve at least one special fresh caught during the week, and probably more. Perhaps, as the rental season grows closer, you'll see more.
Wanna make your own, stop by the harbor house seafood market in Hatteras. Miss Vicki sells raw, fresh and items she makes ready to heat and eat.

RE: Local seafood
Posted By: rpemers - (Send PM)
Member Since: 8/19/2016
Location: Holland, MI
Total Posts: 205

Date Posted: 4/18/2017 10:22 PM





Wanna make your own, stop by the harbor house seafood market in Hatteras. Miss Vicki sells raw, fresh and items she makes ready to heat and eat.



Absolutely and she has to be one of the nicest people I've ever met. Otherwise hit Frank & Frans for bait and tackle and catch your own. I do smiley

RE: Local seafood
Posted By: Pickle - (Send PM)
Member Since: 9/3/2009
Location: Kitty Hawk
Total Posts: 1869

Date Posted: 4/19/2017 6:57 AM




This question comes up over and over. Not just Hatteras but from Corolla to Ocracoke. All of the above answers are right on. Tim is probably the most accurate. Outer Banks Catch is a nice concept but way tooooooo varied in its membership categories. In addition it has become somewhat of a marketing/advertising campaign to brand Outer Banks Seafood, but not necessarily insure or guaranty its use "At Home". I won't go into the cost factor but restaurants are in business to make money and will assess the cost/profit ratio in their purchases. Several other considerations. A restaurant using local fish (not shrimp, crabs or oysters) has to clean the fish in most cases. It does not come in filleted or portion controlled. This takes storage, time, skill and the discard/"rack" will quickly fill their trash containers. It's much easier Box to Fryer. Availability or Seasons and we can take this further to what do people favor. The most popular or well known species are not always local. The biggest being Salmon (not even close) and probably next Flounder (very seasonal) and the trash fish, Tilapia (never eat one). I would guess if you go to Hawaii you would be recommended Opah, be daring and support our real local fish. Let's talk Spanish Mackerel, Sea Mullet, Cobia, Wahoo, King Mackerel, Sheepshead, Drum, Spot, Croaker, etc.

RE: Local seafood
Posted By: Alexy - (Send PM)
Member Since: 7/10/2008
Location: Warrenton VA and Frisco NC
Total Posts: 5833

Date Posted: 4/19/2017 3:48 PM




and the trash fish, Tilapia (never eat one).


I have a friend who owns a fish farm in Kentucky. They raise catfish that are fed a grain diet.

They are harvested and then tilapia are introduced and they eat the chaff from the grain that was fed to the catfish and also eat the droppings from the catfish.

They are harvested and they introduce swai. They are fed fresh grass clippings and eat the droppings from the other 2 previous species of fish that were harvested. They are harvested and sold to pet food companies. the ponds are then drained and catfish start over.

RE: Local seafood
Posted By: hoi toide - (Send PM)
Member Since: 5/24/2007
Location: Swamp Life
Total Posts: 12960

Date Posted: 4/19/2017 4:05 PM




If you go on facebook many restaurants & fish houses will relate what is in season or daily menu's.

For instance, a Buxton dining establishment had some sort of internet difficulty running credit cards over the holiday weekend, posted about it & had responses right away from patrons.

RE: Local seafood
Posted By: judyk - (Send PM)
Member Since: 11/1/2008
Location: eastern PA
Total Posts: 14114

Date Posted: 4/19/2017 4:19 PM




^ that was Rusty's with the cc machine trouble

I won't eat tilapia ever since I saw a YouTube video of them eating hippo poop essentially as is was being evacuated...ugh

RE: Local seafood
Posted By: obxmini - (Send PM)
Member Since: 7/26/2014
Location: SE NY
Total Posts: 1427

Date Posted: 4/19/2017 4:26 PM




Well, Pickle, Alexy and Judy - I've never wanted to eat Tilapia...though I may have tried it however I shall never eat it again, that's for sure! Not listening



RE: Local seafood
Posted By: General Lee - (Send PM)
Member Since: 7/30/2007
Location: Huntingdon,PA
Total Posts: 70

Date Posted: 4/19/2017 5:37 PM




Why is it so difficult to find out which Hatteras Island restaurants serve local freshly caught seafood? I am headed down in 2 weeks and have been scouring every website I can think of with no luck, I thought sure the Outer Banks Catch site would list them but when you click on the restaurants tab it just keeps looping me right back where I started.



It's likely quite varied, depending on the season availability, etc. Your best bet is to call ahead, or ask your server. Also re: your Dirty Dicks profile photo, They're probably the last place you'd want to go on Hatteras if you're looking for fresh, local seafood.


I never eat at Dick's, just one of my watering holes.

RE: Local seafood
Posted By: Tim-OBX - (Send PM)
Member Since: 6/2/2004
Location: Kitty Hawk
Total Posts: 17744

Date Posted: 4/20/2017 9:14 AM




and the trash fish, Tilapia (never eat one).


I have a friend who owns a fish farm in Kentucky. They raise catfish that are fed a grain diet.

They are harvested and then tilapia are introduced and they eat the chaff from the grain that was fed to the catfish and also eat the droppings from the catfish.

They are harvested and they introduce swai. They are fed fresh grass clippings and eat the droppings from the other 2 previous species of fish that were harvested. They are harvested and sold to pet food companies. the ponds are then drained and catfish start over.



What? No carp? Having grown up on the Mississippi river I use to eat carp and catfish sandwiches and it was well know both are bottom feeders that eat most anything. Interesting how that farm changes form one species to the next. What time period is it from start to finish with the Swai (whatever that is)?

RE: Local seafood
Posted By: MarvelousMoondance - (Send PM)
Member Since: 10/7/2006
Location: Wild and Wonderful WV
Total Posts: 11158

Date Posted: 4/20/2017 9:22 AM




and the trash fish, Tilapia (never eat one).


I have a friend who owns a fish farm in Kentucky. They raise catfish that are fed a grain diet.

They are harvested and then tilapia are introduced and they eat the chaff from the grain that was fed to the catfish and also eat the droppings from the catfish.

They are harvested and they introduce swai. They are fed fresh grass clippings and eat the droppings from the other 2 previous species of fish that were harvested. They are harvested and sold to pet food companies. the ponds are then drained and catfish start over.



What? No carp? Having grown up on the Mississippi river I use to eat carp and catfish sandwiches and it was well know both are bottom feeders that eat most anything. Interesting how that farm changes form one species to the next. What time period is it from start to finish with the Swai (whatever that is)?



Yepyep, i've eaten a lot of carp and catfeesh in my time!
There was a power plant on the Kanawha River and the discharge from it would make a nice warm, shallow, cove across the river where carp would spawn. When i was a teen we made primitive spearing bows attached to our fishing poles.

RE: Local seafood
Posted By: jessicaboyd - (Send PM)
Member Since: 6/19/2016
Location: Evansville, IN
Total Posts: 115

Date Posted: 4/20/2017 9:38 AM




I grew up eating lots of carp and catfish out of the Ohio river. I remember my dad having me terrified, telling me to watch for bones in the catfish, and I did get choked on one once. I was sure that's how I would end up dying. Haven't touched the stuff since childhood; nor anything else from that river.

RE: Local seafood
Posted By: MarvelousMoondance - (Send PM)
Member Since: 10/7/2006
Location: Wild and Wonderful WV
Total Posts: 11158

Date Posted: 4/20/2017 10:04 AM




I grew up eating lots of carp and catfish out of the Ohio river. I remember my dad having me terrified, telling me to watch for bones in the catfish, and I did get choked on one once. I was sure that's how I would end up dying. Haven't touched the stuff since childhood; nor anything else from that river.



The Ohio is now the most polluted river in the country.


RE: Local seafood
Posted By: jessicaboyd - (Send PM)
Member Since: 6/19/2016
Location: Evansville, IN
Total Posts: 115

Date Posted: 4/20/2017 10:11 AM




I grew up eating lots of carp and catfish out of the Ohio river. I remember my dad having me terrified, telling me to watch for bones in the catfish, and I did get choked on one once. I was sure that's how I would end up dying. Haven't touched the stuff since childhood; nor anything else from that river.



The Ohio is now the most polluted river in the country.



Oh, I know. Precisely why I won't touch anything out of that river. I live a block and a half from the river and can often smell it from home. I go boating every weekend, but I won't swim in it.

RE: Local seafood
Posted By: Hllywud - (Send PM)
Member Since: 8/16/2010
Location: South Eastern, PA/ Corolla
Total Posts: 40

Date Posted: 4/20/2017 11:32 AM




A friend of mine is a fish broker and he enlightened me about tilapia. Part of his answer is below:

"Well the main reasons I won't eat it are as follows.

It's a bottom feeding trash fish that was used to clean cat fish farms of their waste. Some country's farm them in rivers that have live stock run off (feces) which the tilapia consume. It was a problem a few years back because tilapia were found to be carrying the avian flu from chicken farm run off.

Tilapia are lazy fish. They don't really swim so they lay in the river beds which can make the meat taste like dirt. When they are harvested they are supposed to be flushed thoroughly, however it's a cheap fish and that adds to the cost.

Wake forest university did a study. Below is a one of the findings.

The report caused further concern when it stated that farmed tilapia contains high levels of arachidonic acid, an omega-6 fatty acid that, while necessary to help repair damaged body tissues, has been linked to brain disorders like Alzheimer’s disease and may exacerbate inflammation."


RE: Local seafood
Posted By: jessicaboyd - (Send PM)
Member Since: 6/19/2016
Location: Evansville, IN
Total Posts: 115

Date Posted: 4/20/2017 12:05 PM




Wow. I'd only heard about the Chinese sewer-raised tilapia before. This is horrible. Guess I'll be throwing away that tilapia in my freezer that I bought locally, labeled as being from Costa Rica. Not worth it.

RE: Local seafood
Posted By: smlobx - (Send PM)
Member Since: 6/13/2011
Location: Hatteras Village
Total Posts: 859

Date Posted: 4/20/2017 2:54 PM




Being a former marine biologist I will just have to agree and not go into the details of Tillapia..

I will however highly recommend Risky Business for fresh locally caught seafood. I have watched many a boat offload their catch right at his place in Hatteras.

Many times you can ask what the catch of the day is and there is a good ( not perfect) chance it is locally caught.

RE: Local seafood
Posted By: Alexy - (Send PM)
Member Since: 7/10/2008
Location: Warrenton VA and Frisco NC
Total Posts: 5833

Date Posted: 4/20/2017 3:10 PM




and the trash fish, Tilapia (never eat one).


I have a friend who owns a fish farm in Kentucky. They raise catfish that are fed a grain diet.

They are harvested and then tilapia are introduced and they eat the chaff from the grain that was fed to the catfish and also eat the droppings from the catfish.

They are harvested and they introduce swai. They are fed fresh grass clippings and eat the droppings from the other 2 previous species of fish that were harvested. They are harvested and sold to pet food companies. the ponds are then drained and catfish start over.



What? No carp? Having grown up on the Mississippi river I use to eat carp and catfish sandwiches and it was well know both are bottom feeders that eat most anything. Interesting how that farm changes form one species to the next. What time period is it from start to finish with the Swai (whatever that is)?


Swai is a vietnamese catfish. Carp have a low fatty oil content and don't process well in the food industry for anything other than whole fillets. I think the turn around on a catfish crop is about a year and a half to two years. Tilapa are harvested in 4 months, the swai about the same.

RE: Local seafood
Posted By: tls141 - (Send PM)
Member Since: 8/14/2010
Location: Western NY
Total Posts: 63

Date Posted: 4/20/2017 3:22 PM




The web site doesn't say much. Basically, right now, one special a week qualifies as fresh catch membership to advertise as part of the program. However, it lists son to come different percentile categories of 50-80% and over 80%. I would think many of the restaurants on Hatteras Island serve at least one special fresh caught during the week, and probably more. Perhaps, as the rental season grows closer, you'll see more.
Wanna make your own, stop by the harbor house seafood market in Hatteras. Miss Vicki sells raw, fresh and items she makes ready to heat and eat.



I highly recommend this seafood store. It is family-run and the people are lovely and have right-off-the-boat seafood. We never fail to make a visit when we are on vacation. Nothing better than fresh grilled seafood eaten on the deck with a beautiful view of the sound.

RE: Local seafood
Posted By: obxyz - (Send PM)
Member Since: 4/10/2011
Location: Pittsburgh
Total Posts: 1017

Date Posted: 4/20/2017 3:30 PM




Tilapia are farmed in some very cheap, but also very gross ways. I remember seeing a video of a dual chicken/tilapia farm. The tilapia were in a cage under water, the chickens were kept atop that cage in another level of cage. On top of that cage the farmer kept rotting chicken guts/fish guts/roadkill which attracted tons of flies. The flies produced an endless flow of maggots which were the only food source for the chickens. The chicken sh*t was the only food for the tilapia. I wonder if the chicken and tilapia were labeled and upcharged as organic?

RE: Local seafood
Posted By: jessicaboyd - (Send PM)
Member Since: 6/19/2016
Location: Evansville, IN
Total Posts: 115

Date Posted: 4/20/2017 3:57 PM




Tilapia are farmed in some very cheap, but also very gross ways. I remember seeing a video of a dual chicken/tilapia farm. The tilapia were in a cage under water, the chickens were kept atop that cage in another level of cage. On top of that cage the farmer kept rotting chicken guts/fish guts/roadkill which attracted tons of flies. The flies produced an endless flow of maggots which were the only food source for the chickens. The chicken sh*t was the only food for the tilapia. I wonder if the chicken and tilapia were labeled and upcharged as organic?



This is absolutely horrible, and I'll be sure to let everyone I know about it. Because I'm in Indiana, and we have been advised to limit our intake of fish from our local waters, I never eat fish here, unless it's an occasional fish from a restaurant. I saw the Costa Rica tilapia at a local grocery store last week, so I thought I'd give it a shot. Nope, not now. I'll just continue to wait until my next Outer Banks trip to eat some fresh (good) fish instead. I really need to relocate.

RE: Local seafood
Posted By: judyk - (Send PM)
Member Since: 11/1/2008
Location: eastern PA
Total Posts: 14114

Date Posted: 4/20/2017 4:07 PM




^^ don't you ever get any walleye from the Great Lakes? I would think you would be close enuf to find it locally sold. Darn good eating fish.

RE: Local seafood
Posted By: hoi toide - (Send PM)
Member Since: 5/24/2007
Location: Swamp Life
Total Posts: 12960

Date Posted: 4/20/2017 4:08 PM




Anyway, as I was wasting time on facebook, up popped sMacNally's on Ocracoke with their daily board specials of "Grilled Rockfish & Fried Blue." Which means stripers & bluefish, FYI. Fish Fish

Breakwater Restaurant at Odens Dock on HI has their daily specials posted now too. 5 of them! Conch Fritters, shrimps, oh my!

Hatteras Sol's daily specials are Yellowfin Tuna & Cajun Shrimps.

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